Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high.


Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin.


With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood.


Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves.


Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke, and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes.


A blood test can show if you have diabetes.


Exercise, weight control, and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed.


Diabetes-Insulin Dependent Type I

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high.


With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin.


Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age.


Symptoms may include:

  • Being very thirsty

  • Urinating often

  • Feeling very hungry or tired

  • Losing weight without trying

  • Having sores that heal slowly

  • Having dry, itchy skin

  • Losing the feeling in your feet or having tingling in your feet

  • Having blurry eyesight

A blood test can show if you have diabetes. If you do, you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life.

Diabetes Mellitus Type II

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high.


With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy.


Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise.


Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes.

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The

symptoms can include:

  • Being very thirsty

  • Urinating often

  • Feeling very hungry or tired

  • Losing weight without trying

  • Having sores that heal slowly

  • Having blurry eyesight

A blood test can show if you have diabetes.


Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines.